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Amazing Art on Japanese Manhole Covers

In Japan, there are many cities and towns that place visually stunning works of art right underneath pedestrians’ feet. There are almost 6,000 of these covers around the country, turning unattractive necessities into eye candy. Photographer S. Morita has documented hundreds of these covers over the years which are available on Morita’s Flickr page.

(Source: flavorwire.com, via quienesesachica)

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rhamphotheca:

This Bizarre Organism Builds Itself a New Genome Every Time It Has Sex
by Greg Miller
Oxytricha trifallax, a ciliophore protozoan, lives in ponds all over the world. Under an electron microscope it looks like a football adorned with tassels. The tiny fringes are the cilia it uses to move around and gobble up algae. What makes Oxytricha unusual, however, is the crazy things it does with its DNA.
Unlike humans and most other organisms on Earth, Oxytricha doesn’t have sex to increase its numbers. It has sex to reinvent itself.
When its food is plentiful, Oxytricha reproduces by making imperfect clones of itself, much like a new plant can grow from a cutting. “If they’re well fed, they won’t mate,” said Laura Landweber, a molecular biologist at Princeton University and lead author of a recent study on Oxytricha genetics. But when Oxytricha gets hungry or stressed, it goes looking for sex.
When two cells come together (as in the image above), the ultimate result is: two cells. “They’ve perfected the art of sex without reproduction,” Landweber said. The exterior of the two cells remains, but each cell swaps half of its genome with the other. “They’re entering into this pact where each one is going to be 50 percent transformed,” Landweber said. “They emerge with a rejuvenated genome.”…
(read more: Wired Science)
image: Robert Hammersmith

rhamphotheca:

This Bizarre Organism Builds Itself a New Genome Every Time It Has Sex

by Greg Miller

Oxytricha trifallax, a ciliophore protozoan, lives in ponds all over the world. Under an electron microscope it looks like a football adorned with tassels. The tiny fringes are the cilia it uses to move around and gobble up algae. What makes Oxytricha unusual, however, is the crazy things it does with its DNA.

Unlike humans and most other organisms on Earth, Oxytricha doesn’t have sex to increase its numbers. It has sex to reinvent itself.

When its food is plentiful, Oxytricha reproduces by making imperfect clones of itself, much like a new plant can grow from a cutting. “If they’re well fed, they won’t mate,” said Laura Landweber, a molecular biologist at Princeton University and lead author of a recent study on Oxytricha genetics. But when Oxytricha gets hungry or stressed, it goes looking for sex.

When two cells come together (as in the image above), the ultimate result is: two cells. “They’ve perfected the art of sex without reproduction,” Landweber said. The exterior of the two cells remains, but each cell swaps half of its genome with the other. “They’re entering into this pact where each one is going to be 50 percent transformed,” Landweber said. “They emerge with a rejuvenated genome.”…

(read more: Wired Science)

image: Robert Hammersmith

(via felistella)

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rire dans sa barbe
[reer dahn sah bahrb ]

(noun) This French, untranslatable phrase is the most relatable occurrence in human nature. Has anybody ever caught you laughing by yourself? Most likely they have and thought you a little strange! This word describes this exact moment, to laugh at oneself quietly while remembering or retelling a past event in your mind. If you ask us, it is quite satisfying to know there is a word for this most delightful instance. 

  • literally: to laugh in your beard. 

(via wordsnquotes)

All the time

(via snow-blanket)

(via quienesesachica)